Grout Damaged with Acid Restored with Grout Colourant in Cheshire

It’s always a good idea to double-check any tile cleaning advice you receive with a professional. Sometimes advice can be inaccurate and cause more problems than good. Such was the case with this customer, who lives in the small town of Appleton near Warrington. He had been advised by his builder to use brick acid to remove carpet glue from a newly discovered Quarry tiled floor. Taking the advice, he had washed the floor several times with a solution of brick acid diluted with water. But while this seemed to successfully remove the carpet glue, it also severely discoloured the grout lines, leaving the entire floor looking grubby and unappealing.

The customer was just about to go on holiday, and asked me to see what could be done to restore the floor’s appearance while he was gone. With the house to myself, I got to work.

Quarry Tiles Before Cleaning in Appleton

Cleaning a Stained Quarry Tiled Floor

My first job was to strip the floor property to remove old sealers present on the tile using a strong dilution of our high alkaline cleaner, Tile Doctor Pro Clean. We use this cleaner on all types of tile and natural stone due to its versatility and consistency.

I spread the solution onto the floor and left to dwell for twenty minutes before scrubbing with a black pad fitted to a floor rotary machine. This process also removed the years of dirt and dust that had penetrated through the recently removed carpet. I also paid attention to the grout lines giving them a good scrub with a stiff grout brush, but the acid staining proved to be impossible to remove completely.

While I’m not sure exactly how long the floor had been covered by carpet, it’s safe to say a deep clean had been long, long overdue. Once I had cleaned the floor to a high standard, I used a wet-vac to remove the now dirty cleaning solution from the floor, before leaving it to dry off completely overnight.

Sealing a Quarry Tiled Floor

Upon my return to the property the next day, I tested to make sure the floor was dry enough to seal, which is important as excess moisture can cloud the sealer and damage its performance.

Once satisfied, I applied one coat of Tile Doctor Colour Grow, which is our impregnating sealer designed to really bring out the natural colours in the tile, followed by two coats of Tile Doctor Seal and Go to give the tiles a stain resistant, low-sheen finish.

After this was dry I coloured the grout lines with a matching Tile Doctor Grout Colourant to cover and hide the damage the acid had caused to the grout lines. Finally, I gave the floor three more coats of Seal and Go to add the finishing touches.

Quarry Tiles After Cleaning in Appleton

My customer returned from holiday to find a completely transformed floor. Looking at the before and after photos, it is easy to see why he was more than happy with the result! Another satisfied customer.
 
 
Source: Tile and Grout Restoration Service in Cheshire

Bathroom Tile Grout Refresh

To clean grout we normally recommend a good scrub with Tile Doctor Pro-Clean which is an strong alkaline product, in some cases however the staining cannot be removed completely and the only thing your can do with the exception of re-grouting is to re-colour the grout with a Grout Colourant which are available in ten popular colours.

In the case of this bathroom at a house in Paisley near Glasgow both the floor of the bathroom and the shower wall tiles were in need of a refresh and after a review of possible solutions is was agreed the easiest thing to do would be to re-colour the floor grout with a Light Grey colourant and the wall tiles with a White colourant.

Bathroom Floor Paisley Before Grout Colouring Shower Wall Tiles Paisley Before Grout Colouring

Cleaning and Colouring Grout

The first step before grout colouring is to give the grout a good scrub with Tile Doctor Pro-Clean to get it as clean as possible before applying the colourant. The grout was then rinsed and then dried ready for the colourant to be applied. You may be surprised to hear but we often find the biggest cause of staining to grout are the dyes contained in soaps and shampoos.

Once the grout is ready it’s a straightforward process of applying the colourant evenly along with thin coats along the grout line working the brush backwards and forwards whilst minimising the amount that gets on the tile. We were not changing the colour of the grout substantially so one coat of colourant was sufficient for both sets of tile.

With two colours being applied we were careful to ensure different brushes were used for each job to avoid any contamination and once the job was complete a damp pad was used to remove excess product from the tile surface.

Bathroom Floor Paisley After Grout Colouring Shower Wall Tiles Paisley After Grout Colouring

As you can see from the photographs the difference was immediate, the other advantage of the colourant is it forms a barrier over the grout protecting it from staining and making it easier to clean going forward.
 
 
Source: Bathroom Tile and Grout Cleaning Service in Paisley

Cleaning and Removing Grout Haze from a Quarry Tiled floor in Kemsing, Kent

The attached pictures are of a Quarry Tiled floor in a kitchen and family room of a cottage in Kemsing, Kent. The cottage was undergoing a full renovation and extension, and the quarry tiled floor was recently installed, however it was not sealed prior to grouting, and a grey grout haze was now sitting across the whole floor. Quarry tiles are highly porous and if not sealed before grouting the grout sitting on the tile soaks in leaving the colour of the grout as a haze over the tile.

Quarry Tile Floor Before

Cleaning Quarry Tiles

There had been a number of tradesmen working constantly on the premises so it was difficult to tell what was grout haze and what was builders mess so I the first job was to give the floor a good clean. For this I used a strong mixture of Tile Doctor Pro-Clean diluted with water in a 3:1 ratio. I also added a squirt of Tile Doctor NanoTech Ultra-Clean which is an abrasive clean cleaner and processed to apply the solution to the floor. I left the solution to dwell on the floor for a short while and then scrubbed the floor using my weighted floor scrubbing machine fitted with a black 17inch scrubbing pad. The cleaning residue was removed using a wet vacuum and we could now see all the grout haze quite clearly.

Quarry Tile Floor Before

Removing Grout Haze from Quarry Tiles

To remove the grout haze one part Tile Doctor Grout Clean-up was mixed with three parts water and poured into a spray bottle; Grout Clean-up is a product specifically designed for removing grout haze. This was then sprayed onto the floor, covering an area of around 1m2 and spread so it covered the grout haze evenly. This was allowed to dwell on the tile for three to four minutes before I agitated the solution by hand with a pan scrubber and water. This was then vacuumed up before I took a scrubbing brush and clean water from another bucket and scrubbed the area, before again vacuuming up. This ensured that all the formula had been cleansed from the floor; this process was repeated across the whole floor, working on 1m2 at a time and then left to dry ready for sealing.

Quarry Tile Floor Before

Sealing Quarry Tiles

The floor was now ready for sealing; Quarry tile floors can accept two types of sealer, a topical sealer or an impregnated sealer. I usually recommend Tile Doctor “Seal & Go” for Quarry tiled floors which is a Topical sealer as it is easier to maintain. On this occasion however the customer wanted to wait until they had completed decorating and was happy to seal the floor themselves, so I gave them advice on what sealers to use and how best to use them and left them to it.

Quarry Tile Floor After Quarry Tile Floor After

 
 
Source: Removing Grout Haze from Quarry Tiles